Posted tagged ‘snow storm’

“That’s what we are now—just ants. Only——” “Yes,” I said. “We’re eatable ants.”

February 7, 2016

My tree is mostly off the deck. It is not yet totally upright, but it’s getting there. Clumps are still falling off the branches. The sun is bright in a cloudless sky. It will be in the 40’s all day then it will get colder, and the snow will make a return visit. 6-10 inches are supposed to fall before the morning. Every kid will be hoping for a snow day, the first of the winter.

Tonight we’re celebrating Chinese New Year, the year of the monkey. In case you were wondering the lucky numbers are four and nine.

My parents told lies. I’m not talking tooth fairy, Santa or the Easter Bunny, but real untruths. I figured they were protecting us. The one I still remember is they told us Chinese food was just for adults. We begged to taste it but that didn’t happen. They said it wasn’t good for kids. I believed them for the longest time.

My father used to put so much hot mustard on his Chinese food that his nose ran from the heat. He’d pull out his white handkerchief, blow his nose and then go back to eating. I also use the hot mustard, and once in a while when I overdo, my nose runs, and I think of my father. It’s a bit weird I suppose that a Chinese food runny nose brings such a strong memory.

I’m watching the original 1953 War of the Worlds, and I want to slap the lead female. She’s a crier and a screamer. She covers her ears as if to blot out the sounds of the saucers and her eyes so as not to see them; however, she is not without some redeeming qualities much appreciated in the 50’s. She can make perfect fried eggs and toast.

“No man is sane who does not know how to be insane on the proper occasions.”

March 1, 2015

Yesterday was the longest day. I left home at 8:50 and arrived back at 4:30. I more than doubled the week’s mileage on my car. The festival was fun and time passed quickly. The day started with a parade of flags marching in a line from one building to another. Our destination was the stage where we took turns at the microphone introducing our countries. The best part of the parade was the dragon the Chinese dancers carried. After the introductions, we marched back to the main hall to man our tables. Lots of people stopped at the Peace Corps table, some with questions and others to get a sticker in their passports. Every little kid, and a few adults, carried a passport, and every table provided a sticker for the passport and wrote the name of the table below it, think of it as a visa, and there were prizes at the end of the event for the most stickers. It is a neat idea, the passports, as kids get to visit the different countries’ exhibits and the tables get traffic. My favorite was the Chinese stamp as the table’s name was written in characters. Germany had its own sticker in gold. My favorite table was from India. It had a great elephant lamp with the most colorful shade shaped like an umbrella. The men at the table wore Indian clothes, and I loved the colors. Upstairs was the bazaar, and I bought a few things including cardamom bread from the Finnish table, cheese from Italy and a couple pf stocking stuffers from China. It was, all in all, a good day.

Last night at 9:50 the electricity died. First thing I did was look out the window, and it was the whole neighborhood. Luckily my lantern was right beside the couch. It has been that sort of a winter when keeping a lantern close is a good idea. I turned off the lights, and we all went upstairs to stay warm under the comforters. I had my Smithsonian and my iPad so I was content. I turned on the light above me so I’d be awakened when the electricity came back and then I got cozy and fell asleep. Around 12:30 the light woke me up. Normalcy had been restored so I went back to sleep. This morning I found the TV on as I had forgotten all about it. My phone was blinking because there was a message from the electric company saying it was faulty equipment as if that explained anything.

On the front page of the Globe are two pictures side by side. One is of an Anchorage street with no snow at all and the other is of a street in Boston with mounds of snow along its sides measured in feet and so much snow on the street you’d have to guess what it is. If I could write a sigh you could hear, I would, but I can’t so just imagine a long and loud sigh as you read the next line: snow is coming starting this evening. The prediction is 3-6 inches, a small snow storm as snow storms go, but none of us can’t think of it that way. It is the proverbial last straw. It is the last drop. I’m going to scream, a horrible scream, a frightening scream as if my sanity has left me.

“Snow provokes responses that reach right back to childhood.”

January 27, 2015

Last night I was fretful and had trouble getting to sleep. The wind howled and had that runaway train sound. Gusts blew up to 55+ miles. I woke up every hour and checked my old clock radio to see if the time was still lit. Finally around 4:30 I fell asleep. When I woke up at 8, it took a minute or two before I remembered to check the radio. It was still lit. Glory! Glory! I have electricity. When I came downstairs, I had trouble getting the back door open. I had to really push to move the snow. When the door opened, Gracie took one look out then looked at me. I could read her question, “Do you really expect me to go out in that?” I closed the door. She was relieved. I don’t know how long it will be before she has no choice but to go out. I wouldn’t mind if she went on the deck, but she never has.

No plow has yet to tackle my street. The snow is drifting, borne by the wind. My car is perfectly cleared of snow. Last night it was covered. I can’t see out of most of my windows as the mesh of the screens has caught the snow. I watched the news for a while, but it is all the same, a rehash of the weather, live shots of some poor on-site reporter being buffeted by the wind and no schools listings still running along the bottom. By now you’d expect that every one knows the schools are closed.

I am not a fan of daytime TV, but Doctor Who, the David Tennant Doctor Who, is on BBC. The Doctor and his companion, Donna Noble, are in ancient Pompeii, on Volcano Day. The current Doctor has a major part in this episode. I wonder if someone remembered him when they went looking for the newest doctor. During commercials I looked in on the Lone Ranger, a regular on CoziTV. I like how the sets transition from real outside to an inside house. When the door is opened, you can see the fake scenery outside the door. A stagecoach was being driven outside on a dirt road. When the coach was stopped, it was inside. I laughed at the prisoner handcuffed to the deputy. His eyes kept shifting back and forth. He was obviously the proverbial bad guy.

We are only about half-way through the storm.

“Are ye the ghosts of fallen leaves, O flakes of snow, For which, through naked trees, the winds A-mourning go?”

March 27, 2014

The storm was terrific. The snow fell sideways because of the close to hurricane force wind. Tree limbs were blown and bent. The bird feeders flew from to side to side, sometimes even with birds holding on for dear life. The snow drifted. Some spots had little or no snow while others had deep snow, the sort where you lift your legs high above the drift instead of trying to plow your way through. I couldn’t see beyond the house across the street because of white-out conditions. Gracie went out in the morning without fuss but hurried inside when she was done. The second time she went out the snow was still falling but was tapering. She squatted with her back to the gate which was a good thing because the gate behind her slowly opened. I ran down the steps which were covered in snow while holding on to the rail also covered in snow. I don’t know why I didn’t fall as it seemed perfect for a dive off the steps; instead, I shut the gate before Gracie even knew it was open. She turned and looked at me then went farther into the backyard. I climbed up the snowy steps and got back into the house. My slippers were so covered in snow you couldn’t tell what they were. My socks had snow clinging to them, and my pants were soaked from the bottom almost to the knees. My hands were freezing, but I didn’t care. Gracie was still in the yard.

By last night the snow had tapered to a few errant flakes, but the wind continued to blow and whistle. I fell asleep to the sound. It was tremendous.

Winter is not leaving easily. It is scratching and pawing the ground trying to keep a handhold. Yesterday was a day in January. Schools were closed. Cars stayed off the roads. I was drawn, as I am when it snows, to the back door to watch the storm. I listened to the wind and saw the trees bend left then right then back again. It was an amazing storm. It was spectacular.

“Americans can eat garbage, provided you sprinkle it liberally with ketchup, mustard, chili sauce, Tabasco sauce, cayenne pepper, or any other condiment which destroys the original flavor of the dish”

March 25, 2014

A blue sky and lots of sun belie the prediction of snow. I’d be skeptical bout the storm except every weather cast says the same thing. We are getting the most snow here on the cape, but luckily the amount has been reduced from 6-12 inches to 6-8 inches. Dangerous winds and blizzard conditions are also predicted.

Food is on my mind today. Peapod came yesterday and my fridge is filled. Before that delivery it seemed only condiments were left. Pickles, I have pickles of all sorts, and I have mustards of all flavors. I have relish and piccalilli and ketchup which I seldom use. Thai cucumber sauce, Thai peanut dressing and Jungle Safari Sauce are some of the odd bottles on the side shelf. I have a chuck of salt from Columbia’s salt mine on the bottom shelf. I keep it there so it won’t melt. Bottles of jalapeño peppers, both diced and sliced, are also on the door shelf. I use them all the time in salsas, quesadillas, sandwiches and scrambled eggs. Mayonnaise, always Cain’s, and horseradish sauce are two of my favorites. I use the horseradish sauce on hot dogs and sandwiches. It adds a nice bite. A snowman bottle holds maple syrup, the real stuff. I use it on my French toast and sometimes on chicken I bake in the oven. Chicken and maple go together well. Every now and then I check the shelf and combine jars of the same stuff and toss jars with little or nothing left. I have no idea why I put them back, habit I guess.

My cabinets have been cleaned within the last year. Stuff long expired, we’re talking years here, were tossed. I organized like items to make them easier to find, made one shelf all baking ingredients and another, a smaller shelf, food coloring, extracts and sprinkles of all colors. I was able to free the top shelf for dishes, for my Christmas dishes. That made me feel most accomplished. Empty shelves in this house are difficult to come by.

Today will be a sloth day.

“Then come the wild weather, come sleet or come snow, we will stand by each other, however it blow.”

January 2, 2014

Gracie and I were intrepid travelers, and we just got back from facing the elements head-on. The main roads are clear just from traffic, but the side roads, including mine, are snow-covered. I slid a bit going around the corner, but I expected I might and was going very slowly just in case. First I got cat food, litter and dog treats. Next I provisioned for me. I bought a pizza made by my favorite place but not yet cooked, a couple of very small meatloaves, cheddar and jalapeño dip, a quesadilla needing to be re-heated, cream for my coffee and dark chocolate nonpareils for my soul. Being in storm mode means treating myself to good food. I have a book I haven’t finished and one waiting to be started. The house is warm.

This morning I noticed the feeders were half empty. I figured there might be enough, but then I thought not through tomorrow so out I went to the deck and filled four feeders: two sunflower and two thistle. I didn’t want my birds to be hungry.

The snow is more intense now than it was earlier when the flakes were small. Schools are all closed and many have already announced they’d be closed tomorrow because the storm is supposed to last all night into tomorrow afternoon. It is the height of high tide now so the waves are huge and rough. They hit the sea walls with such force the tops of the waves flow over the walls. The news said the storm will last so long they’d be three high tides. We are expected to get between 8-12 inches leaning toward the higher amount. One weather man described the nighttime part of the storm as coming down like gangbusters. I liked that description though I’m not liking the snow.

I expect to be snowed-in until Friday. It makes no sense to plow before the storm ends. Meanwhile, I’ll enjoy the day and keep an eye on the snow. It is pretty.