The Sewing Machine: Betty Hutton

Posted May 20, 2018 by katry
Categories: Video

Rosemary Rose: The Kinks

Posted May 20, 2018 by katry
Categories: Video

Silver Threads and Golden Needles: The Springfields

Posted May 20, 2018 by katry
Categories: Video

Family Hands: Mary Chapin Carpenter

Posted May 20, 2018 by katry
Categories: Video

Posted May 20, 2018 by katry
Categories: photo

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“We may have different religions, different languages, different colored skin, but we all belong to one human race.”

Posted May 20, 2018 by katry
Categories: Musings

Last night it rained heavily. I could hear it on the roof. I fell asleep to the sound. Today it is supposed to rain again. When I went to get the papers, I was surprised at how warm it is.

Mouse 3 was in the trap this morning. He looked exactly like the other 2. I tried to put the leash on Henry so he could come on the short ride to relocate the mouse. I want to start to get him used to the car, but Henry took off out the dog door. I didn’t chase him; instead, I took the mouse to the car. When I got to a wooded section of the road, I stopped and opened the trap. The mouse didn’t go out. I shook the trap. The mouse stayed. That went on for a while then the mouse jumped out the opening and almost jumped into my car. I was relieved when the wee beastie finally took off into the bush. I’ll reset the trap in a bit.

When I was in Ghana, I had to wear dresses all the time. I didn’t really mind except when getting off or on mammy lorries because I had to climb up on the back to get to and from the seats. Ghana is hot, and in the heat, dresses were cooler than pants would have been. I had to have my dresses made. There were no clothing stores. My seamstress was the wife of a fellow teacher. She lived right next door to me. I’d buy cloth in the market and bring it to her, and she’d make dresses in a variety of designs. Most were without sleeves. My favorite dresses were usually tie-dye. The colors were vibrant. The patterns haphazardly interesting. After paying the market lady and the seamstress, the cost of the dress was usually around 5 cedis, equal to 5 dollars in those days. When I went back to Ghana the first time, I had two shirts made. I forget the cost of the cloth, tie-dye of course, but the shirts were 25 cedis each, around 7 or 8 dollars. They are beautiful.

My memory is one of my favorite places to visit. I go through all those memory drawers for bits and pieces and whole memories. My time in Ghana fills a few drawers. I always think of that as the most amazing experience of my life. I was at home in a place so totally foreign than I had known in all my life before and since. Ghana still feels like home to me.

Sail on Sailor: The Beach Boys

Posted May 19, 2018 by katry
Categories: Video