What’s right is beautiful: what’s beautiful breeds joy: what breeds joy is goodness.”

I can feel the warmth coming. It’s that sort of a morning, a morning still and dark, a humid morning. Sounds seem louder: a dog barking from down the street, cars going by the house and the clicking of Gracie’s collar when she runs around the yard. Every now and then she comes into the house usually panting from her run. Gracie just wants a pat and the assurance I’m still here then she goes back outside.

Tonight is a play and that’s it for my weekend dance card, but I’m just fine with indolence. I figure the deck is as fine a place as any to spend my time.

I seldom watch TV in the daytime, but today I made an exception. The Brink’s Job is offered On Demand. I love that movie because it takes place in Boston and a couple of scenes are in the town where I grew up. They chose it because the uptown was frozen in time, a perfect 50’s time. Since then, however, uptown has changed, but in the movie I get to see my town, the one I remember from my childhood.

I need to get a couple of passport pictures so I can send for my Ghanaian visa. Last year the visa ran out before I left, but, just as I expected, no one noticed when I was leaving. Ghana takes a lackadaisical approach to both entires and departures. No one checked my yellow shot record when I arrived, and they took only a cursory look at my passport. All of that reminded me of a re-entry when I was in the Peace Corps and returning to Ghana after traveling. I was at Kotoka International and was denied re-entry despite my resident’s visa and my re-entry permit. A cholera epidemic had started while I was gone and without a shot I couldn’t enter. I explained I wasn’t a casual visitor: I lived in Ghana and wanted to go home. No was the answer. I then asked the official if he’d let me in if I raised my right hand and swore to God to get a shot. He said yes so I swore to get a shot and off I went right to Peace Corps where I got the shot just as I promised.

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13 Comments on “What’s right is beautiful: what’s beautiful breeds joy: what breeds joy is goodness.””

  1. olof1 Says:

    We’ve had a rather nice weather here today but as usual the rain came when I drove home šŸ™‚ šŸ™‚ šŸ™‚ But it wasn’t that bad to be honest. But it feels like thunder is nearby and the winds has become strong, the gusts even stronger so a big branch broke on a tree over at my neighbor’s.

    They have never checked my passport when I have traveled. There’s only two reason for that, my name and my skin color. Once on a train travel to Paris they let me sleep while they dragged out the black man sharing my sleeping compartment. I didn’t see him again until next morning. That unfortunately happens often when traveling in Europe.

    I sometimes looked through my fathers passport when I was a child, he was a sailor and had lots of stamps in his. I think they should make that a law in all countries šŸ™‚ I want those stamps so I can look at them every now and again and remember the trip šŸ™‚

    Have a great day!
    Christer.

    • Kat Says:

      Christer,
      It’s now 1:30 and has reached 80Ėš and is getting warmer. We had rain for about 5 minutes then the sum came back with a vengeance.

      In most places, they do check or at least stamp my passport. In Ghana and most African countries I need a visa so I do expect them to check that. In Morocco, I got a visa at the airport-much easier.

      My Peace Corps passport was so filled with visas and stamps that it had to have additional pages added. They were glued to the last page and came out fanlike. It was cool to have filled so many pages.

  2. Hedley Says:

    when its quiet, I like to watch the torch relay, the grace and dignity of wounded warriors, community leaders, celebrities, each taking their turn to run through deep and enthusiastic crowds in the villages and towns

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/torchrelay

    On July 20 the torch will be on my home territory and a week later, Delta will be taking us to London and the Olympics

    I have plays next weekend up at Stratford, dancing singing and Shakespeare. I cannot take musicals having napped through both Phantom and Les Mis. I like grown up stuff without singing cats, trains or dictators. We will see “One Man Two Guvnors” at the Haymarket.

    • Kat Says:

      My Dear Hedley,
      I watched the main screen then a couple of the smaller. I admit to getting misty eyed seeing Torvill and Dean again. They looked so good back together on the ice.

      I too am not enchanted by musicals but I do have a few I really like-1776 is one of them.

      It’s less than a month away!!

      • Hedley Says:

        I am totally on the clock. Been going crazy to try and add a session in the Olympic stadium for athletics but not been lucky so far. Got just under four weeks to sort it out

  3. Birgit Says:

    Stamps in passports…
    Reminds me of the one only song from Ghana in my music files.
    A funny whistle-and-stamp tune, but you probably already know it:
    Work Song From Postal Employees in Ghana
    http://blog.wfmu.org/freeform/2005/12/work_song_from_.html

    • Kat Says:

      Birgit,
      Thanks for that link! I actually have that song though I have no idea where I got it. I also have a whole album from Smithsonian of “squeeze-bulb honk horns, bells, drums, and voices to sound the world of union drivers and their vehicles on the 50th anniversary of Ghana’s independence. ” It’s an odd album!

  4. MT C Says:

    That’s a good story, entry for a promise! Made me laugh!

    That’s a bit like entry here. An American can just walk in from the plane, pay the 10 KD, and stand in line for the processing to get a visa. The visitor visa is only good for 90 days and then you have to leave and come back in for another 90 days. So, I’m going with my son and his wife to Dubai for three or four days, more to see what that country is like as much as anything. Walter is really looking forward to it as it is really his first chance to get out and relax for three whole days since he got here six years ago, and he is ready for a beer. Hard for me to believe its really been that long. There were again be no problem for he and I to get visitor’s visas at the point of entry. However, his wife is from the Philippines and she has to jump through hoops to get her visa approved before she gets there, and post a huge bond to ensure that she leaves by the time it expires. They don’t want folks hanging around I would guess.

    Carl

    • Kat Says:

      Carl,
      Dubai is supposed to be an amazing country with all sorts of new buildings from oil money and, TA DA, the world’s largest mall! I hope you have a great trip!!

      What a pain to have to keep going back for the visa. When I lived in Ghana, I had a resident’s permit, but when I left the country, I had to have a re-entry permit which was annoying to get. I swear it was just to raise money!

      The rules for the different countries and their visas are inconsistent. For Ghana my passport goes off to Washington with a return, registered envelope for them to use to send my passport back. Next week I’ll be sending one off!

    • MT C Says:

      I agree whole heartedly, visas are just for the money. In the PI, I had to get mine extended every two months. Usually cost me a morning and from sixty to a hundred bucks. And at the end of 14 months, I had to leave the country and come back in. Could be out for a minute or a day, didn’t matter as long as I had the exit stamp, airport tax receipt and entry stamp I could be back in for another 14 months.

      If I get a job here, the working visa is for two years and the company I work for has to apply for it and is responsible for renewing it also. AND it does cost a bit of something. And if you have less than 3 months left on your visa, don’t expect to be able to buy any services (new) or vehicles. Its a requirement.

      Yes, I do wish there were more uniformity from country to country.

      Carl

      • Kat Says:

        Carl,
        The Peace Corps took care of the visa when I was in Ghana, but i still had to get the darn re-entry permit, and I remember trying to get my Togo visa. The guy at the embassy would tell us to come back tomorrow as he wasn’t in the mood today!

    • MT C Says:

      I’ll let you know when the Dubai photos are up on Box. Which is my new place to put things. My F******k of sorts. I was actually on FB once and left as I didn’t care for the management’s change of user agreements. Took a while to actually get my account removed and it took posting some XXX material to get it completely removed, as they like getting votes from dead people too.

      And Multiply is getting a bit pushy since they were bought out. So, I’m thinking, cloud computing is about as private as can be had. I’ll be sure to give you access when I get them and maybe a bit of a story posted as well.

      Carl

      • Kat Says:

        Carl,
        I’m looking forward to those pictures! The ones I’ve seen of Dubai are magnificent, and all of it from my money-my gas money!!

        I use flickr for my pictures but I don’t use it all that often.


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