“Fashion is a language that creates itself in clothes to interpret reality.” 

Some days are just ugly by nature. Today is one of those days. Light showers are predicted, and it will stay in the 50’s. I will be cozy and warm at home.

My finger still hurts. I figure it will hurt for a while. Right now it is a useless limb which objects to my hand being used at all. I have to keep stopping because typing is a problem.

When I was a kid, clothes were divided by function. I had school clothes, my uniform, and school shoes. The rule was I had to change as soon as I got home into my play clothes and my sneakers. I had church clothes, usually a skirt and blouse. I never wore that outfit anywhere else. It was a once a week outfit. My school shoes, though, were for Sundays as well. I had special outfits like a new Easter dress every year and usually new clothes, in wrapped presents under the Christmas tree.

In college, I had to wear skirts or dresses, no pants, until the winter of my sophomore year. That was about the coldest winter in a long while. We had fierce winds and snow. Walking to class between buildings was like taking your life into your hands. The winds buffeted you. Your legs and feet froze. That was when the rule changed. We were allowed to wear pants. The dress code disappeared forever.

In Ghana, I had to wear a dress every day. Only yama yama girls wore pants. They did their business mostly in the cities, proverbially on street corners. I brought with me several dresses, skirts and blouses,, but in a short time I had dresses made with Ghanaian cloth. They were all I wore. Ghanaian women wore beautiful dresses, often two piece dresses, made with local cloth in vibrant colors. Their more formal outfit was three pieces, a top, a long skirt and a matching cloth wrap around them about the middle. They were beautiful.

When I went back to Ghana after so many years, acceptable clothing for women had changed. I saw far fewer women wearing traditional cloth. The ones who did were mostly older women. I was sorry for the change though I understood it. Pants were now acceptable, but I knew that ahead of time so I had brought pants to wear, but while I was there, I had blouses and dresses made from the beautiful cloth I had bought in the market. They were my connection to my memories of that earlier time in Ghana. I love those clothes.

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2 Comments on ““Fashion is a language that creates itself in clothes to interpret reality.” ”

  1. Bob Says:

    Hi Kat,

    Since 1990, my company has supplied me with uniforms for work. We started out wearing navy blazers, gray trousers, light blue, button down, oxford, shirts. They also gave us red and blue silk ties. The uniforms came from J.C. Penny and looked very good. Over the years the quality of the jackets declined as the company looked for less expensive uniforms. Eventually we had a global head of training who surveyed all the instructors globally about uniforms and they overwhelmingly voted for business casual. One reason we dumped the ties and the jackets is that we had female instructors. Obviously, woman don’t wear ties. We got rid of the jackets and ties to save both save money and to stay out of the neckwear debate.

    I wear jeans, golf shirts and athletic shoes on the weekends.

    Today is just a warmer version of yesterday. The high temperature today will reach a pleasant 85°.

    • katry Says:

      Hi Bob,
      I think the whole world has become far more casual. Most places around here have only the shirts as a uniform part. In some places, I think uniforms are necessary. I was aways impressed to see the pilots with their black uniforms. They looked so professional to me. As for your switch, it seems that business casual is just perfect. Most guys I know hate wearing ties. I saw the same changes in school. Male teachers went from suits to shirts and ties then they ditched the ties for golf shirts. I don’t think it made a difference.

      It has been raining on and off all day and has been cold and damp.


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